Tag Archives: Port Meadow

Flood!!

Here are the boats I photographed the other day – there is rather more water there now!

Today I collected so many great images to paint, that I hardly know where to start, which is a very good feeling!  (Though I will be good and finish my commissions first, of course.)

It was perfect timing too: as I finished up, the sun retreated behind that cloud layer, and the landscape became flat:

So I was very grateful.  I then retreated home, again as quickly as possible on my bike, (zooming past the many gridlocked cars – Oxford is a bit of a nightmare for drivers and bus users at the moment 🙁  I’m sorry for you drivers and bus users 🙁 Roads are closed, flooded, all over the place) and I endeavoured to warm up with 3 hot drinks in rapid succession.

So, now that I am thawed, I need to stop blogging and sorting out photos, and paint!!

Landscape

Can you feel the cold?!  I could – seeping into ma bones!  I’m painting some landscapes of Port Meadow, Oxford, this week, so I’m collecting some images to work from.  After about 90 minutes of feeling my warmth slowly ebbing away, I stumbled back to my bike and cycled home as fast as I could to get my circulation going again.  Thank goodness for photography though!!  I think I’d have mould growing on me by now, if I was painting out there today 🙂

(At this time of the year, I’m glad to not live on a boat.  Pretty though, int it?  In a bleak and muddy sort of a way.)

Port Meadow Sunset

These photos are taken as I bump along on my bike (and then beside my bike as it gets darker) beside the River Thames (ok Isis in Oxford) where it runs through the ancient Port Meadow.  Port Meadow has always been a meadow.  In the 10th century the “Freemen” of Oxford were given it and allowed to graze their cattle and horses on it, and they still do.  The herds wander the flat expanse in docile packs.

It is normally partially flooded, and as it got darker I missed one of the “low stone bridges laid over washes and ditches for the purposes of horseracing in the 18th and 19th century” and began to wade through mud.  I made it home though, and I’ve experimented with using the images for paintings – though they almost have too little information in them.  Still, it was an adventure, and a distinctly Oxford one.